Wherever I am, the world comes after me.
It offers me its busyness. It does not believe that I do not want it.
Now I understand 
why the old poets of China went so far
and high 
into the mountains, then crept into the pale mist.
"The Old Poets of China" by Mary Oliver

The Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman will hold an international conference, "Sabang: Early Southeast Asian-European Intercultural Encounters," which will be held—via Zoom—from 18 to 20 March 2021. Times below are Philippine Standard Time (GMT + 8). You may view the program and book of abstracts. Program subject to change without immediate notice. Please check "Updates" tab.
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  • UPDATES

    UPDATES

    Program and Book of Abstracts uploaded; see Mar 18, 19, 20 tabs (3/18/2021)
    Updated Wonder Guide (3/17/2021)
    Q&A system and tab, and Wonder tab added (3/16/2021)
    New start time for 18 March 2021: 09:00 am (3/11/2021)
    New schedule for Day 1, Keynote: 09:15 am–09:45 am (3/11/2021)
    Day 1 Keynote: No Q&A session (3/11/2021)

    WITHDRAWALS

    Day 2, Panel 5: The Meaning Behind the Action: Study on Teungku Syik Kuta Karang Hand Writing Living in Colonial Era (3/5/2021)
    Day 3, Panel 8: Colonized Blood Covenants: Ritualized Friendship...... (3/19/2021)
  • MAR 18

    MARCH 18: PROGRAM

    Click/unclick on the tabs to view/close the content. Multiple tabs can be open at the same time.
     Click on the titles to pop up the abstracts. View PDF of Program and Book of Abstracts.

    09:00 am • Opening Program

    09:00 am • Opening Program

    9:00 am–9:15 am
    OPENING PROGRAM

    National Anthem of the Philippines
    Welcome Remarks
              Fidel Nemenzo, DSc, Chancellor, University of the Philippines Diliman
    Cecilia de la Paz, PhD, Director, Office for the Initiatives of Culture and the Arts, University of the Philippines Diliman
    Joefe B. Santarita, PhD, Dean and Professor, Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman
    House Rules and Conference Guidelines

    09:15 am • Keynote 1: Southeast Asia and the Quincentennial Commemoration of the First Circumnavigation of the World

    09:15 am • Keynote 1: Southeast Asia and the Quincentennial Commemoration of the First Circumnavigation of the World

    9:15 am–9:45 am
    KEYNOTE LECTURE

    Southeast Asia and the Quincentennial Commemoration of the First Circumnavigation of the World
    Dr. Rene R. Escalante, Chair, National Historical Commission of the Philippines

    09:45 am • Panel 1: Indigenous and Colonial Medicine

    09:45 am • Panel 1: Indigenous and Colonial Medicine

    09:45 am–11:15 am
    PANEL 1: INDIGENOUS and COLONIAL MEDICINE

    Traditional Medicine in the Philippines and Early Southeast Asian-European Encounters
         Michael L. Tan, University of the Philippines Diliman
    The Hilot of the Philippines and the Dukun Bayi of Indonesia Compared
         Ma. Luisa T. Camagay, Department of History, University of the Philippines Diliman
    MSS 2996: Curiosity to A Medicinal Chest?
         Mohd Affendi B. Mohd Shafri, International Islamic University Malaysia

    12:15 pm • Panel 2: Trade and Diplomacy

    12:15 pm • Panel 2: Trade and Diplomacy

    12:15 pm–1:45 pm
    PANEL 2: TRADE AND DIPLOMACY

    Addressing Southeast Asian Leadership: Diplomatic Narratives and the Ordering of Colonial Knowledge
         Stephen L. Keck, Emirates Diplomatic Academy, UAE
    Friendship and Unity Among Us: The Dutch-Asian Elephant Diplomacy in the Seventeenth Century
         Pichayapat Naisupap, Leiden University
    Danes in the Manila Trade, XVII-XIX Centuries
         Andrés del Castillo Sánchez, El Colegio de México AC

    02:00 pm • Panel 3: Colonial Knowledge and Intermediaries

    02:00 pm • Panel 3: Colonial Knowledge and Intermediaries

    02:00 pm – 3:30 pm
    PANEL 3: COLONIAL KNOWLEDGE AND INTERMEDIARIES

    Re-reading 'Sucesos:' Revisiting Morga in Some Books, Texts, and Places
         Rolando Talampas, University of the Philippines Diliman
    Tensions of Hybridity: Native Officers as Intermediaries in Scripting Colonial Order in British Burma
         Alexey Kirichenko, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Moscow State University
    Spanish Manila’s Media Anata: Groundwork for Quantitative Global Histories from Below, 1654–1687
         Nicholas C. Sy, University of the Philippines Diliman
     

     

    03:45 pm • Roundtable 1: History, Theories, and Prospects of Philippine Studies as a Discipline

    03:45 pm • Roundtable 1: History, Theories, and Prospects of Philippine Studies as a Discipline

    3:45 pm–5:00 pm
    ROUNDTABLE 1: History, Theories, and Prospects of Philippine Studies as a Discipline

    Discussion Questions
        1. What do you think is the relevance of Philippine Studies in the age of globalization, and how can we situate this relevance within the context of the ongoing global health emergency?
        2. In this age of globalization, should we jettison theories, approaches, and paradigms which, rightly or wrongly, purportedly border on the essentialist and nativist problematizing of Philippine culture and society?  How about foreign theories?  Should they be abandoned in the name of indigeneity and nationalism?
        3. What are the prospects for Philippine Studies in the digital era?  What are the challenges?
        4. Considering that Filipinos have become, by some accounts, a diasporic people, what is the importance of Philippine Studies with respect to Filipino migrant communities?  What is the role of these migrant communities in promoting Philippine Studies?
        5. How can Philippine Studies help promote inclusivity?  Has it really helped address some of the social ills that have beset the country?  How? 
    Participants

    Filomeno Aguilar, Jr. PhD
    Professor, Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines

    Noel Christian Moratilla, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Asian Center, University of the Philippines

    Cristina Martinez-Juan, PhD
    Executive Officer, Philippine Studies @ School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)

     

     
  • MAR 19

    MARCH 19: PROGRAM

    Click/unclick on the tabs to view/close the content. Multiple tabs can be open at the same time.
     Click on the titles to pop up the abstracts. View PDF of Program and Book of Abstracts.

    08:15 am • Keynote 2: The Successful ‘Portuguese’ Encounter with the Malay-Indonesian World of the 16th Century

    8:15 am–9:30 am
    KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    The Successful ‘Portuguese’ Encounter with the Malay-Indonesian World of the 16th Century
         Prof. Leonard Y. Andaya, University of Hawaii at Manoa
    The encounter of the Portuguese with the Malay Indonesian world of the 16th century was characterized by the complementarity of both the “white” or European Portuguese and the “black” Portuguese or those who were of overwhelmingly local Asian descent. While the former provided the model for Portugueseness, it was the latter who succeeded in blending it with local cultures that were crucial to the success of the Portuguese enterprise.  The ability of the black Portuguese to understand local perceptions of meaningful unities of bodies of water—what in the Philippines is captured in the indigenous term “sabang”—enabled the Portuguese to establish thriving international hybrid entrepots at Melaka on the Malay Peninsula, at Makassar on the southwest peninsula of Sulawesi (Celebes) and at Larantuka in eastern Indonesia in the 16th and into the 17th centuries.
    Profile
    Leonard Y. Andaya, PhD is Professor of Southeast Asian Historyat the University of Hawai' at Manoa. He has written on the early modern history of Malaysia, Indonesia, the southern Philippines, and southern Thailand. He is the co-author of "A History of Early Modern Southeast Asia, 1400–1830"  (2015).

    09:45 am • Panel 4: Race and Religion

    09:45 am • Panel 4: Race and Religion

    9:45 am–11:15 am
    PANEL 4: RACE and RELIGION

    Chinos Indios as Sexual Deviants: Sodomy as Colonial Trope of Moral Panic in the Early Spanish Philippines
               Thomas David F. Chaves, University of the Philippines Diliman
    Christianity and Racism in Post-colonial Society: White Jesus, Black Piet and Normalized Racism in Ambon, Indonesia
               Hanry Harlen Tapotubun, Christian State Institution, Ambon, Indonesia
    Religious Syncretism of Libad Apung Iru and the Kapampangan Pre-colonial Beliefs
               James Darwin N. Lagman, Mabalacat City College, Philippines

    12:15 pm • Panel 5: Language and Communication

    12:15 pm • Panel 5: Language and Communication

    12:15 pm–1:45 pm
    Panel 5: Language and Communication  

    The Meaning Behind the Action: Study on Teungku Syik Kuta Karang Hand Writing Living in Colonial Era
              Dr. Fakhriati, Center for Research and Development on Religious Literature and Heritage (WITHDREW)
    Zamboanga Chavacano from "Hawker Spanish" to "Slightly Spanish": The Trajectory of a Creole's Social Prestige
              Jillian Loise Melchor and Dr. Miguel Blázquez, Erasmus Mundus MA Crossways in Cultural Narratives, Department of European Languages (UP Diliman)
    In the (re/un)ma(r)king: Batuk (Philippine Traditional Tattoos) in the Diaspora
              Lovey Ann F. Marquez, KU Leuven

    02:00 pm • Panel 6: Colonial Identities

    02:00 pm • Panel 6: Colonial Identities

    2:00 pm–3:30 pm
    PANEL 6: COLONIAL IDENTITIES

    To Reward Her for This Devotion - Catholic Manipulation of the Conversion of Early-Modern Philippine Women
              Steven J. Fluckiger, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
    Melchor de Avalos and the Political Status of Tagalog Muslims
              Isaac Donoso, University of Alicante, Spain
    The Imposition of the Sorbonne Method in the Formation of an Indigenous Clergy in South-East Asia: the Example of Siam in 1685
              Maëlle Pennéguès, University Lumière Lyon II, France

    03:45 pm • Roundtable 2: Locating Early Modern Southeast Asia

    03:45 pm • Roundtable 2: Locating Early Modern Southeast Asia

    3:45 pm–5:00 pm
    ROUNDTABLE 2: Locating Early Modern Southeast Asia

    Discussion Questions
      1. Can you describe the regional and global connections made or unmade during the early modern period (c.1400-1800) in Southeast Asia?  What do you think were the impact of European arrival to various states and societies in Southeast Asia during this period?
      2. Conversely, what do you think were the impact of early Southeast Asian-European interaction in the politics and societies in Europe, if at all?
      3. How important was the early period of Southeast Asian-European interaction to the later political trajectory of colonial and postcolonial states in the region? 
      4. In your view, what are the themes, sources, approaches, geographic regions that remain frontiers for research on early modern Southeast Asia?
    Participants
    Joefe B. Santarita, PhD
         Dean and Professor, Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman
    Ariel C. Lopez, PhD
         Assistant Professor, Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman
    David Henley, PhD
         Professor, Leiden University, Netherlands
    Stefan Amirell, PhD
         Professor, Linnaeus University, Sweden
  • MAR 20

    MARCH 20: PROGRAM

    Click/unclick on the tabs to view/close the content. Multiple tabs can be open at the same time.
     Click on the titles to pop up the abstracts. View PDF of Program and Book of Abstracts.

    08:15 am • Panel 7: Colonial Images and Narratives

    08:15 am • Panel 7: Colonial Images and Narratives

    8:15 AM – 9:45 AM
    PANEL 7: COLONIAL IMAGES AND NARRATIVES

    Revisiting the Boxer Codex: How the Filipino “Indio” within Early Modern Colonial Encounters Uncovers the Construction of the Filipino Identity
              Jessica Nicole R. Manuel, University of the Philippines Diliman

    The Mingling of Asian and European Art Traditions in the Boxer Codex Illustrations
             Clio Kimberly R. Tantoco, University of the Philippines Diliman

    Búyo in the Narratives of Early Spanish-Austronesian Intercultural Encounters
              Mark Anthony B. Cabigas, Samahan ng mga Mag-aaral ng Kasaysayan, Philippine Normal University

    10:00 am • Panel 8: Rituals and Performance

    10:00 am • Panel 8: Rituals and Performance

    10:00 AM – 11:30 AM
    PANEL 8: RITUALS AND PERFORMANCE

    An Orosipon ni Ina: A Case for the Syncretic Origin of the Peñafrancia Festival in Bicol, Philippines
              Al B. Rodriguez, Asian Center, UP Diliman

    Colonizing Blood Covenants: Ritualized Friendship and Contractual Colonialism in Early Filipino-Spanish Encounters
               Arthit Jiamrattanyoo, University of Washington (WITHDRAWAL)

    Sayaw sa Ginunting: A Postcolonial Analysis of a Wedding Dance
              Kyle Philip M. Ravena, University of the Philippines Diliman

    12:30 pm • Panel 9: Place and Memory

    12:30 pm • Panel 9: Place and Memory

    12:30 pm–2:00 pm
    PANEL 9: PLACE AND MEMORY

    Indigeneity and Ethnicity of Suverna Bhumi (Burma): A View from Colonisers
              Sumit Mondal, Central University of Gujarat and Sampayan Chakravarty, Delhi University 
    A Local View from Northeastern Taiwan to Understand Intercultural Encounters between Europe and Asia and their Indirect Effects
              Li-Ying Wang, University of Washington 
    From Remembrance to Recreation: Memory of European Houses in Urban Landscape Manila (Philippines) and Saigon (Vietnam) during the Colonial Period
               Nguyet Thi Minh Nguyen, Faculty of History, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Vietnam National University

    02:15 pm • Keynote 3: Shifting the entrepôt paradigm: Local Agents and Indigenous Voices in the Making of Manila’s Global Connections, ca. 16th-18th Century

    02:15 pm • Keynote 3: Shifting the entrepôt paradigm: Local Agents and Indigenous Voices in the Making of Manila’s Global Connections, ca. 16th-18th Century

    2:15 pm–3:30 pm
    KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Shifting the Entrepôt Paradigm: Local Agents and Indigenous Voices in the Making of Manila’s Global Connections, ca. 16th-18th Century
    Dr. Birgit Tremml-Werner, Linnaeus University, Sweden
    In recent decades, a rich body of scholarship has demonstrated that Manila was more than just a trans-shipment port. Studies on far-reaching intra-Asian, Austronesian, and trans-Pacific connections have posed a challenge to narratives of both galleon-centricity and irrational colonial governance. Yet, there continues to exist an overemphasis on actors and processes reaching the Philippines from abroad, while both indigenous agency and colonial policies are rendered secondary to the course of events. However, from the sixteenth century onwards, a long list of ‘connectors’ including among many others ‘mestizo de sangley’-interpreters, provincial parish priests, colonial officials, indigenous chiefs, localized foreign residents, indigenous allies, beatas, and Spanish women, were at the heart of local and global projects. Zooming in on such local agents opens up new vistas for a nuanced global history of a connected archipelago.

    03:45 pm • Panel 10: Warfare and Military History

    03:45 pm • Panel 10: Warfare and Military History

    3:45 pm–5:15 pm
    PANEL 10: WARFARE AND MILITARY HISTORY

    Lantak: Ingenious Fire Making Device of Southeast Asia
              Jeffrey James C. Ligero, University of the Philippines Los Baños
    The Royal Artillery Foundry of Manila: Technical Labor and Global Circulation (1580–1676)
              Eder A. Gallegos, Universidad Pablo de Olavide de Sevilla
    The Extinct of Fortified Dwellings (Kotta/Kuta) in Southeast Kalimantan
              Sunarningsih, Balai Arkeologi Kalimantan Selatan

  • KEYNOTE

    MEET OUR KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

    March 18: Dr. Rene R. Escalante

    March 18: Dr. Rene R. Escalante

    Southeast Asia and the Quincentennial Commemoration of the First Circumnavigation of the World

    Date and Time
    0815 am, 18 March 2021 0915 am – 0945 am (No Q&A session)
    Profile
    Rene R. Escalante, PhD is the Executive Director of the National Quincentennial Committee, which aims to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the "Victory at Mactan (27 April 2021) and...of the Philippine part in the first circumnavigation of the world." 

    View Full Profile


    March 19: Dr. Leonard Andaya

    March 19: Dr. Leonard Andaya

    The ‘Portuguese’ Encounter with the Malay-Indonesian World of the 16th Century

    Date and Time
    08:15 am, 19 March 2021
    Abstract
    The encounter of the Portuguese with the Malay Indonesian world of the 16th century was characterized by the complementarity of both the “white” or European Portuguese and the “black” Portuguese or those who were of overwhelmingly local Asian descent. While the former provided the model for Portugueseness, it was the latter who succeeded in blending it with local cultures that were crucial to the success of the Portuguese enterprise.  The ability of the black Portuguese to understand local perceptions of meaningful unities of bodies of water—what in the Philippines is captured in the indigenous term “sabang”—enabled the Portuguese to establish thriving international hybrid entrepots at Melaka on the Malay Peninsula, at Makassar on the southwest peninsula of Sulawesi (Celebes) and at Larantuka in eastern Indonesia in the 16th and into the 17th centuries.
    Profile
    Leonard Y. Andaya, PhD is Professor of Southeast Asian Historyat the University of Hawai' at Manoa. He has written on the early modern history of Malaysia, Indonesia, the southern Philippines, and southern Thailand. He is the co-author of "A History of Early Modern Southeast Asia, 1400–1830"  (2015)

    View Full Profile


    March 20: Dr. Birgit Tremml-Werner

    March 20: Dr. Birgit Tremml-Werner

    Shifting the Entrepot Paradigm: Local Agents and Indigenous Voices in the Making of Manila's Global Connections, ca. 16th to 18th Century

    Time and Date
    02:00 pm, 20 March 2021
    Abstract
    In recent decades, a rich body of scholarship has demonstrated that Manila was more than just a trans-shipment port. Studies on far-reaching intra-Asian, Austronesian, and trans-Pacific connections have posed a challenge to narratives of both galleon-centricity and irrational colonial governance. Yet, there continues to exist an overemphasis on actors and processes reaching the Philippines from abroad, while both indigenous agency and colonial policies are rendered secondary to the course of events. However, from the sixteenth century onwards, a long list of ‘connectors’ including among many others ‘mestizo de sangley’-interpreters, provincial parish priests, colonial officials, indigenous chiefs, localized foreign residents, indigenous allies, beatas, and Spanish women, were at the heart of local and global projects. Zooming in on such local agents opens up new vistas for a nuanced global history of a connected archipelago
    Profile
    Birgit Tremml-Werner is a lecturer at Linnaeus University in Sweden. She has a Mag. phil. and Dr. phil. degrees in History (with a minor in Japanese Studies) from the University of Vienna. She is the author of Spain, China, and Japan in Manila, 1571-1644: Local Comparisons, Global Connections (2015).

    View Full Profile

     

    All photos were taken from each speaker's respective profile pages

  • PRESENTERS

    REMINDERS for PRESENTERS

    Please take time to go through these reminders to help ensure a smooth webinar experience for everyone. These may all be subject to change, so please check back regularly,  by 17 March,  and even during the conference, for updates here and/or via email.

    Join Link and Sign-In

    1. Presenters DO NOT NEED to fill out the registration link above. That is only for the audience (non-presenters).
    2. Sometime before the conference, panelists will receive an email containing the link to join the webinar/conference as a panelist.** Please check your email's Spam folder. It is advised that you star this email or add it to your email's favorites to help you locate it easily. The sender is "Asian Center UPD" and the subject line is "Panelist for...."
    3. If you have not received your "Join Link" by 15 March, please inform the Conference Secretariat. 
    4. Your join link is tied to your Zoom account, so it is unique/exclusive to you. Please don't share it with anyone else.
    5. Presenters must click the said link and just sign in to their Zoom account. To help ensure a smoother log-in experience, sign in to your Zoom account first before clicking on the link. 
    6. The same "Join Link" will be used for the entire three-day session. There is no need to re-register.

    **The conference secretariat will notify presenters if and when they should expect the Join link, and receive additional instructions. As with the audience, signing in to a Zoom account is required for panelists.

    Q&A

    Please consult the Q&A tab to read how the Q&A will proceed. 

    Call Time

    Presenters must log in at least 30 minutes before their panel, though they may of course attend the other sessions. This early start can help you get settled and address any technical issue. 

    Renaming Your Zoom Profile

    Sometime before the conference, please log in to the Zoom website, go to Profile, and click "Edit" to rename yourself thus: P1 Amy Peralta. P1 means Panel 1, and so on. This will help the conference team to identify you more easily and anytime during the webinar. 

    Introduction of Panelists

    The moderators/ emcees will introduce each panelist before playing the recording of his/her presentation.

    During the Presentations

    The conference staff will play your pre-recorded presentation, but we do ask that you have it (both the file of presentation and the video)  on hand and be ready to screen-share, just in case the conference staff encounters a technical difficulty. We hope it doesn't come to this, but you'll never know.

    In-Webinar Communications Outside Zoom

    We will use the Zoom chat feature as much as possible to send messages to all presenters, so kindly monitor the chat window as often as you can. However, the Chat window can sometimes get too crowded, and it may be difficult to backread.
    Thus, please always be on the lookout for email announcements (to be sent to your Zoom email address). Also, you may also wish contact us via Facebook Messenger (https://www.facebook.com/upasiancenter) or via Google Hangout (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or just email the conference secretariat.
    The conference team is also exploring online websites to facilitate in-webinar communications and interactions with the audience. Please expect updates soon.

    Recording of the Webinar

    The entire conference will be recorded.
  • AUDIENCE

    REMINDERS for the AUDIENCE

    Please take time to go through these reminders to help ensure a smooth webinar experience for everyone. These may all be subject to change, so please check back regularly,  by 17 March,  and even during the conference, for updates here and/or via email.

    For Non-Presenters (Audience)

    1. Please click on the registration button above. Registration is free.
    2. Upon registration, you will receive an email containing a link to join the conference. Please check your Spam folder if you don't see it in your main inbox.  The sender should be "Asian Center UPD."
    3. Please do not share that link with anybody else; it is unique/exclusive to you.
    4. Signing in to at least a basic/free Zoom account is required to attend the conference. To help ensure a smoother log-in experience, sign in to your Zoom account first before clicking on the "Join link."
    5. The webinar can accommodate only 500 at any given time, so joining/participation is available on a first-come, first-served basis.
    6. Please keep comments and questions fair and professional from sending rude/derogatory comments or questions to the panelists/organizers. The organizers reserve the right to remove from the webinar participants who send rude/demeaning messages.
    7. The same "Join Link" sent to you can be used for all sessions even on a different days. There is no need to register again.
    8. Livestream may be initiated ONLY IF the participants exceed 500, so please register still.

    Q&A System

    See Q&A tab.

    Recording Notice

    The entire conference will be recorded.
  • Q&A

    Q&A Format

    1. The audience can post—anonymously if they wish—their questions on the Q&A window of the Zoom webinar. They must indicate the speaker to whom they are addressing the question: "Dr. Jones, why do....." This will help everyone keep track.
    2. During the Q&A, the moderator and/or the speakers will choose, read aloud, and answer on air any open question (s). However, the panelists/presenters are also free to type in their answers as soon as their presentations are completed.
    3. Just before the first presentation of a panel ends, all remaining open questions will be dismissed. However, panelists-presenters have the option to reopen and respond to these questions during break time or until just before the first presentation of the next panel ends (see Item # 2). This, we hope, can help ensure that only questions for the current panel's Q&A are visible and thus easier to see/read through.
    4.  Please minimize (extensive) discussions with the audience/panelists via the Zoom Chat window. (Only) if the panelists and/or wish to discuss things further and answer more questions, they can join the Wonder room. If you are taking part in post-panel discussions, the audience are instructed to send their questions via chat, and you can just read out answer the questions. Audio may be possible if there are few participants in the circle. See "Wonder" tab for link and guidelines.

    5. Kindly check back before, and even during the conference to see updates. Major updates will be announced during the conference.
  • WONDER

    On Wonder

    The organizers chose Wonder to serve as an out-of-Zoom communications platform where the audience and/or the panelists can interact. Participation in Wonder is optional, and your use of the site is at your own risk. It is a third-party app that will require access to your microphone and/or camera. Kindly note that the University of the Philippines has no subscription to, and partnership with, Wonder. 
    You can turn off your mic and camera while inside Wonder, but should you participate, please block Wonder’s access to your microphone and camera after leaving Wonder. You can do this by going to the security settings of your browser. The UP Asian Center will not be liable for any untoward incidents that may arise from your use of Wonder.  
    If you agree to these terms, follow the guide below and click on the link at the bottom  of this page.

    Guide to Wonder

    1. TURN OFF YOUR AUDIO and VIDEO in ZOOM AND OTHER APPS THAT USE YOUR MICROPHONE (or leave the Zoom and return later) WHILE INSIDE WONDER. At the same time, lower the volume of your computer, and slowly raise it to desired level. This helps prevent any feedback or loud noises if and when you enter Wonder and speak up.
    2. Visit the Wonder Room (link below) and type password (to be provided here or via the Zoom chat). By joining, you agree to these terms.
    3. Depending on your browser's settings, you may have to allow your browser to access to your microphone and/or camera (microphone access is required). Your browser may prompt these, but you may also see (struck-out) microphone and camera icons on the URL bar (i.e. where you type the website name). These icons are clickable and allow you to give or withhold access to your microphone and/or camera. If you disable your camera, you won't have a photo/image/screenshot  (that's fine).
    4. Type your name and click "Next." You may also upload a photo ONLY IF YOU WISH.
    5. Follow any prompts for audio and video checks.
    6. Answer the question, “What Would You Like to Chat About?” This can help you identify others with similar interests; your name and your answer will be visible if people "hover" the mouse/pointer on your avatar/circle.

    Inside Wonder

    1. TURN OFF YOUR AUDIO and VIDEO in ZOOM AND OTHER APPS THAT USE YOUR MICROPHONE (Or you may leave altogether and return to the webinar later on).
    2. The audience and panelists are free to move around the sessions and/or join the circles or the Rooms. Use your mouse or arrow keys to drag/move around the rooms or to your preferred room, circle, or person. Click and hold to automatically drag the cursor to your preferred location.
    3. Four “Rooms” (white faded squares) will be visible on your screen, corresponding to the speaker order in the program. Please move in and out of the rooms as necessary.
    • Panelist/Speaker 1
    • Panelist/Speaker 2
    • Panelist/Speaker 3
    • Just Hanging Out
    Speaker 1, 2, 3 correspond to, and are reserved for, the panel that has just concluded. Presenters from previous panels may initiate a separate circle.
    3. Once inside a room, you have to enter the circle (the first two participants must combine their circles to create a bigger circle for  others to join in). The panelists may or may not be present in their corresponding room, in which case, the audience is free to discuss the paper amongst themselves (via Chat) or video/audio.

    You may send your questions via Chat and the panelist can read them out. Audio is possible depending on the number of participants in the circle.

    By joining a circle, you will see the video (if it's on) of the members of that circle. And you may also chat with them either as a circle or privately. In a circle, you have the option to turn on your cameras/mics.

    4. To leave a circle, just drag yourself out of the said circle.

    5. Please observe courtesy and respect at all times. Kindly do not interrupt ongoing conversations. Wonder is a public room, so please avoid sharing confidential/sensitive information. Everyone is free to approach one another.
    6. You can zoom in/out to see the different rooms by click the +/- signs or scrolling your mouse. You can turn off your mic and camera while inside Wonder (Remember, your Zoom audio and video must be off while inside wonder). The controls are found the bottom of the Wonder room.
    7. TURN OFF YOUR AUDIO and VIDEO in ZOOM AND OTHER APPS THAT USE YOUR MICROPHONE (Or you may leave Zoom altogether and return to the webinar later on.

    After You Leave Wonder: Security Tip

    1.  Please block Wonder’s access to your microphone and camera each time after leaving Wonder. You can do this by going to the security settings of your browser.

    If you accept these terms, please click on the link below. By clicking, you signify your acceptance and understanding of the foregoing terms. TURN OFF YOUR AUDIO and VIDEO in ZOOM AND OTHER APPS THAT USE YOUR MICROPHONE. Click the link below to join. Please message us in Zoom to get the password. 

    I READ, UNDERSTAND, and ACCEPT THESE TERMS: JOIN THE WONDER ROOM

  • About the Conference

    ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

    The word “Sabang” in Visayan and several other Philippine languages refers to the juncture of bodies of water;  it encapsulates the meeting of cultures and the centrality of the Philippines in Southeast Asia-Europe exchanges. "Sabang: Early Southeast Asian-European Intercultural Encounters" aims to discuss the varied cultural legacies of this encounter.
    While the conference’s inspiration draws primarily from the Philippine-Spanish experience, it also seeks presentations on and from neighboring Southeast Asian countries that: 
    • Highlight similarities and differences with the Philippine experience
    • Employ inter- and trans-disciplinary approaches to understand cultural exchange and hybridity

    Concept and Rationale

    RATIONALE

    The Philippines’ entanglement with Hispanic and Hispanicized cultures from the sixteenth century facilitated the flow and exhange of goods and ideas to and from Asia, on the one hand and the Americas and Europe, on the other. The Philippines, Manila in particular, played a crucial role not only as an important trans-shipment point for American silver, Chinese porcelain, textiles, and other products, but also as a melting pot of cultures. The 500th anniversary of the Philippine-Spanish encounter provides an opportune moment to analyze and reflect on the vaunted yet largely understudied intercultural encounters between Europe and Asia.

     


    Organizers and Conference Chairs

    ORGANIZERS

    • Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman
    • National Historical Commission of the Philippines
    • Office of the Initiative for Culture and the Arts, University of the Philippines Diliman

    CONFERENCE CHAIRS

    • Ariel Lopez, PhD, Assistant Professor, Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman
    • Noel Christian Moratilla, PhD, Assistant Professor, Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman

     

  • CONTACT

    CONTACT: HOW CAN WE HELP YOU?

    Please direct all inquiries to the Conference Secretariat via email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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